Outapi offers affordable land to low-income earners

By Eliaser Ndeyanale at Outapi


OUTAPI Town Council is giving a preferential treatment in the allocation of residential plots to low-income earners, such as petrol attendants, cashiers and junior police officers. This is according to the town council’s Chief Executive Officer Nashilongo Ananias.

Speaking to Confidente recently, Nashilongo said the council allows people to buy the land on which they have put up their shacks in order to build conventional houses. He told this publication that when people put up shacks on town council land, the council allocates numbers to them and measures the size of their shacks.

This, he said, was being done to address the housing backlog in one of the fast growing northern towns. “Most of them have land measuring 300 to 400 square metres. They pay N$15 per square metre and at the completion of the payment we issue them title of deeds, then they can start building their houses. But some people pay N$10 per square meters. It depends on the size of the shack,” he explained.

He further said the council was doing this because it is cognizant of the fact that people who earn less than N$10 000 per month cannot be expected to secure a bond from a commercial bank to build houses.

He noted that the town council has around 4200 people on its waiting list of people who have applied for land, mostly low- and ultra-low-income people who cannot obtain loans from major financial institutions. “That is why we have decided to give permanent erven to constables, sergeants and petrol attendants,” he said.

He said the town plans to extend its boundaries in a bid to provide land for housing and businesses.

“The town land is occupied by homesteads but they are willing to leave. The villages such as Omushii, Oshima, Ohambalanganga, Nakayale, Okalunga, Okayile and Omukoko are in the boundaries of the town. When we get funds we will compensate them so that they could create space for the growth of the town,” he remarked, adding that the government compensation policy needs to be revised as it is the reason people sometimes refuse to vacate their mahangu fields to allow for the growth of the town because the amount of money offered in the policy is little, because inflation which has gone up.

He said Outapi has a lot of serviced land where houses are being constructed. “At extensions 12, 13 and 14 we have 965 erven, but some of the erven have already been built with the owners already in the houses. At extension 15, there are 146 plots fully serviced with water, electricity, sewerage and a gravel road.

“Extension 9 has been developed through a public private partnership, where 178 plots was given to Shev properties cc. That company has already started road and electricity [installations]. Construction is ongoing and will end hopefully in 2021.

“We have 64 houses at Extension 3. There are people in some of the houses but some of them are still unoccupied. We are also planning to build 253 houses at the same extension, the tender has been awarded to six companies.

“We also have round about 300 houses at Camelthorn [and] we allocated land to institutions of higher learning, such as the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) and the International University of Management (IUM)… to build a nursing school.”