Van Wyk takes spinning by storm

By Michael Uugwanga

Car spinning is still not that popular in Namibia, but a teenager by the name of Kyle van Wyk is taking mo-torsport spinning by storm and wants to become the best spinner in the country.

The 16-year-old has been practicing since he was given a car to drive by his father at the tender age of eight years – something unusual for a father to give his car keys to a kid, especially given the risk of car accidents.

Spinning involves turning the steering wheel all the way to the desired direction with the car in either stand- still of moving position, through shifting gears, applying throttle and handling the clutch, whilst manoeuvring the vehicle at the same time and it is typically done until the back tyres burst.

Some spinners perform stunts by climbing out of a moving vehicle and thereafter jumping on the bonnet and roof be- fore re-enter- ing the moving car, whilst the tyres are still screeching.

The driver typically manoeuvres the vehicle so that it spins round, creating a cloud of smoke and dust, while the driver casually steps out the car still spinning round.

Van Wyk is a pupil at Delta Secondary School in Windhoek.

This weekend on 23 Novem- ber, there will be motorsport spinning at Okahandja Airstrip, where some of the country’s top motor spinners will be competing for top honours, with van Wyk being one of the main attractions at the event.

“I am a keen motorsport fan with undeniable skills and have been taking part in spinning since the age of 13. Having my father as my role model has definitely encouraged me... I am my father’s son, and we have a love for fast, built-up cars. Being the youngest with a V8 engine, is a milestone for me personally.

“For the past two years I have been growing in skill with triple 360s and kitchen manoeuvers being my favourite stunts. Since then I improved my skills onto the spinning pad, showing no signs of slowing down. Currently I’m being spon- sored by my father who has trusted me behind the wheel since I was eight years, when I started driving his Land Cruiser on the farm,” said van Wyk.

Spinning is controlled and is legal in Namibia, regulat- ed through the Namibian Motor Sport Federation, where affiliated clubs regis- ter and once an assessment is done, can form a club and arrange events on permitted dates. Motorsport events are hosted all over the country.

Van Wyk, who is based in Windhoek, is already the proud owner of Team Kyle Motorsport Club, which he established this month with the aim of growing his brand. I am now a member of Okahandja Spinning and Drifting (OSD)/ Team Kyle club.

“We have a pitch in Okahandja, where all our events will be held. We do collaborate with other clubs locally to perform at their events, as well. I have had the pleasure of performing at Uncle Luke’s birthday bash in South Africa, where I performed with the elite
of South Africa’s spinners, such as Eddy Rasta and Team Saluki, to mention a few. I also partook in Team Saluki’s annual event in Maropeng (South Africa), where I met a lot of my idols and obviously learned new skills and manoeuvres,” van Wyk enthused.

Despite the risks, van Wyk said the sport is relatively safe if one follows the rules of it. “First of all when inside the car one must focus on the car and not on the crowd, because then you will lose focus. Only in the third round is when you can play with the crowd. Normally you spin five times,” he explained.